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FrostbiteEngine: RT @EAStarWars: Legendary battles. All three eras. #StarWarsBattlefrontII is coming this November. https://t.co/YIQvn0dogn

FrostbiteEngine: RT @EAStarWars: Legendary battles. All three eras. #StarWarsBattlefrontII is coming this November. https://t.co/YIQvn0dogn

We're very proud of PGA Tour :)
We're very proud of PGA Tour :)


EA SPORTS Rory McIlroy PGA TOUR Feature Overview: Frostbite 3
www.easports.com
Experience every detail in ways you’ve never seen before.
https://youtube.com/devicesupport
High Dynamic Range color grading and display in Frostbite

High Dynamic Range color grading and display in Frostbite

Talk by Alex Fry at GDC 2017.

This talk presents the approach Frostbite took to add support for HDR displays. It will summarize Frostbite’s previous post processing pipeline and what the issues were. Attendees will learn the decisions made to fix these issues, improve the color grading workflow and support high quality HDR and SDR output. This session will detail the display mapping used to implement the”grade once, output many” approach to targeting any display and why an ad-hoc approach as opposed to filmic tone mapping was chosen. Frostbite retained 3D LUT-based grading flexibility and the accuracy differences of computing these in decorrelated color spaces will be shown. This session will also include the main issues found on early adopter games, differences between HDR standards, optimizations to achieve performance parity with the legacy path and why supporting HDR can also improve the SDR version.

Takeaway
Attendees will learn how and why Frostbite chose to support High Dynamic Range [HDR] displays. They will understand the issues faced and how these were resolved. This talk will be useful for those still to support HDR and provide discussion points for those who already do.

Intended Audience
The intended audience is primarily rendering engineers, technical artists and artists; specifically those who focus on grading and lighting and those interested in HDR displays. Ideally attendees will be familiar with color grading and tonemapping.

High Dynamic Range color grading and display in Frostbite

High Dynamic Range color grading and display in Frostbite

Talk by Alex Fry at GDC 2017.

This talk presents the approach Frostbite took to add support for HDR displays. It will summarize Frostbite’s previous post processing pipeline and what the issues were. Attendees will learn the decisions made to fix these issues, improve the color grading workflow and support high quality HDR and SDR output. This session will detail the display mapping used to implement the”grade once, output many” approach to targeting any display and why an ad-hoc approach as opposed to filmic tone mapping was chosen. Frostbite retained 3D LUT-based grading flexibility and the accuracy differences of computing these in decorrelated color spaces will be shown. This session will also include the main issues found on early adopter games, differences between HDR standards, optimizations to achieve performance parity with the legacy path and why supporting HDR can also improve the SDR version.

Takeaway
Attendees will learn how and why Frostbite chose to support High Dynamic Range [HDR] displays. They will understand the issues faced and how these were resolved. This talk will be useful for those still to support HDR and provide discussion points for those who already do.

Intended Audience
The intended audience is primarily rendering engineers, technical artists and artists; specifically those who focus on grading and lighting and those interested in HDR displays. Ideally attendees will be familiar with color grading and tonemapping.

FrostbiteEngine: "HDR color grading & display in Frostbite", extensive tech talk by @TheFryster at #gdc17 about our transition to HDR https://t.co/oivn9dt9JK

FrostbiteEngine: "HDR color grading & display in Frostbite", extensive tech talk by @TheFryster at #gdc17 about our transition to HDR https://t.co/oivn9dt9JK

Check out what Visceral Games have done on Battlefield Hardline with the help of…
Check out what Visceral Games have done on Battlefield Hardline with the help of our engine, play the Open Beta:


Battlefield Hardline Open Beta Starts February 3rd
battlelog.battlefield.com
Kick back, relax and get an in-depth look at how new innovations in strategy, speed and story are making Battlefield Hardline the complete FPS experience in a brand new trailer released today.
A Real-time Radiosity Architecture – SIGGRAPH 2010
FrameGraph: Extensible Rendering Architecture in Frostbite

FrameGraph: Extensible Rendering Architecture in Frostbite

Talk by Yuriy O’Donnell at GDC 2017.

This talk describes how Frostbite handles rendering architecture challenges that come with having to support a wide variety of games on a single engine. Yuriy describes our new rendering abstraction design, which is based on a graph of all render passes and resources. This approach allows implementation of rendering features in a decoupled and modular way, while still maintaining efficiency.

Intended Takeaway
A graph of all rendering operations for the entire frame is a useful abstraction. The industry can move away from “immediate mode” DX11 style APIs to a higher level system that allows simpler code and efficient GPU utilization.

 

4K Checkerboard in Battlefield 1 and Mass Effect Andromeda

4K Checkerboard in Battlefield 1 and Mass Effect Andromeda

Talk by Graham Wihlidal (Frostbite Labs) at GDC 2017.

Checkerboard rendering is a relatively new technique, popularized recently by the introduction of the PlayStation 4 Pro. Many modern game engines are adding support for it right now, and in this talk, Graham will present an in-depth look at the new implementation in Frostbite, which is used in shipping titles like ‘Battlefield 1′ and ‘Mass Effect Andromeda’. Despite being conceptually simple, checkerboard rendering requires a deep integration into the post-processing chain, in particular temporal anti-aliasing, dynamic resolution scaling, and poses various challenges to existing effects. This presentation will cover the basics of checkerboard rendering, explain the impact on a game engine that powers a wide range of titles, and provide a detailed look at how the current implementation in Frostbite works, including topics like object id, alpha unrolling, gradient adjust, and a highly efficient depth resolve.

Intended Takeaway
Attendees will learn about checkerboard rendering, and how to implement it. This presentation will showcase an efficient checkerboard implementation on the PlayStation 4 Pro, as well as highlight the pitfalls and gotchas learned during the development process.

FrostbiteEngine: "4K Checkerboard in Battlefield 1 & Mass Effect: Andromeda", talk by @gwihlidal in Frostbite Labs at #gdc17. https://t.co/r9qdXRxr0O

FrostbiteEngine: "4K Checkerboard in Battlefield 1 & Mass Effect: Andromeda", talk by @gwihlidal in Frostbite Labs at #gdc17. https://t.co/r9qdXRxr0O

Report by Johan Beck-Norén from Linköping University who did his master thesis a…
Report by Johan Beck-Norén from Linköping University who did his master thesis at DICE about researching & implementing 'mesh colors' per-face texture mapping in Frostbite


Per-face parameterization for Texture Mapping of Geometry in Real-Time - Frostbite
www.frostbite.com
We investigate the mesh colors method for per-face parameterization for texture-mapping of geometry, implemented in the game engine Frostbite 3, for the purpose of evaluating the method compared to traditional texture-mapping in a real-time application.
Frostbite 2 – Features
EASTL is now Open-Source!

EASTL is now Open-Source!

We are happy to announce EASTL, the Electronic Arts Standard Template Library, is now officially open source software and available today on Github under the BSD license! The library offers a wide array of templated containers, algorithms, and iterators useful for runtime, and tool development across multiple platforms. We internally rely heavily on EASTL due to its extensive and robust implementations emphasizing high performance — making it perfect as a foundational technology for the Frostbite engine.

So why release EASTL now? With the rapid cadence of changes to the C++ language there was a desire internally to provide the C++ standards committee with a games industry perspective. By open sourcing EASTL, we are able to help the game industry as a whole make great, high performance games from large companies to small indie teams. As well, now that EASTL is open-sourced Electronic Arts is able to work more closely with the C++ standards committee, ensuring new language features are created with the constraints and needs of game development in mind.

Michael Wong, the C++ Standards Committee Games Dev Chair, had these humbling words to say in regards to EASTL being open-sourced,

“As the chair of SG14 on Games Development, I am excited to see the trend of cross-company collaboration move forward with the open source release of an industry-leading design on a C++ STL that is specially adapted to the Games industry. This too is the goal of SG14 which opens its arm to a collaboration between improving C++ for Games, which is one of the most dominant users of C++. EASTL has been in existence for many years, and benefits from years of continuous revision and improvement, and indeed was used as the beginning structure for further improvement for SG14 proposals. This is a great moment for the Games industry. Thank you to Electronic Arts.”

EASTL has been on Github now for one month and the community response has been amazing! A huge thank you goes out to all the contributors so far helping get the library settled into its new home.

Checkout the repository on Github:
https://github.com/electronicarts/EASTL

Roberto Parolin
Frostbite Vancouver

FrameGraph: Extensible Rendering Architecture in Frostbite

FrameGraph: Extensible Rendering Architecture in Frostbite

Talk by Yuriy O’Donnell at GDC 2017.

This talk describes how Frostbite handles rendering architecture challenges that come with having to support a wide variety of games on a single engine. Yuriy describes our new rendering abstraction design, which is based on a graph of all render passes and resources. This approach allows implementation of rendering features in a decoupled and modular way, while still maintaining efficiency.

Intended Takeaway
A graph of all rendering operations for the entire frame is a useful abstraction. The industry can move away from “immediate mode” DX11 style APIs to a higher level system that allows simpler code and efficient GPU utilization.

 

FrostbiteEngine: "FrameGraph: Extensible Rendering Architecture in Frostbite" presentation slides by @YuriyODonnell at #gdc17 up now! https://t.co/q8Mwss4lYx

FrostbiteEngine: "FrameGraph: Extensible Rendering Architecture in Frostbite" presentation slides by @YuriyODonnell at #gdc17 up now! https://t.co/q8Mwss4lYx

Exciting work that we are doing on iOS!
Exciting work that we are doing on iOS!


Frostbite Tech Demo: Battlefield 4 on iOS - Frostbite
www.frostbite.com
Frostbite is not only the heart of the Battlefield games on PC and console – it’s also pushing technical boundaries on mobile. Kristoffer Benjaminsson, Product Owner Mobile at Frostbite, tells you about the team’s greatest mobile challenge yet – getting parts of Battlefield 4 running on iOS.
Frostbite 1 – Promo with BFBC
Frostbite games shine at E3 2015

Frostbite games shine at E3 2015

Frostbite empowers games like Battlefield: Hardline and Dragon Age Inquisition, and at E3 2015, EA showed off a suite of upcoming titles that’ll run on engine. From first-person shooters in a galaxy far, far away, to racing and sports titles much closer to home, Frostbite is shaping the future of gaming.

Here’s a glimpse of what Frostbite is bringing to you in the coming months.

Star Wars Battlefront

Mirror’s Edge Catalyst

Need for Speed

PGA Tour

Mass Effect

Plants vs Zombies Garden Warfare 2

The Frostbite team is really excited for the upcoming lineup of titles running the engine, and we can’t wait to show you more!

Tiled Light Trees

Tiled Light Trees

Technical paper by Yuriy O’Donnell (Frostbite) and Matthäus Chajdas (AMD) for I3D 2017.

Handling many light sources in real-time is still one of the big challenges in real-time graphics. Even the most recent approaches like practical clustered shading still have various problem cases with low performance. Especially in scenes with high depth variance, existing algorithms cannot adapt to the distribution of light sources properly and end up evaluating many lights that don’t contribute to the final image.

We present a new approach, “tiled light trees” – a hierarchical acceleration structure that adapts to the light source distribution. Our approach improves on the worst case performance of existing solutions. Due to traversal overhead, the proposed algorithm can be sometimes slower than clustered shading. To handle those situations optimally, we propose a hybrid approach which combines the strengths of light trees with clustered shading, outperforming any individual solution in nearly every case. Our new hybrid algorithm is easy to implement and suitable for usage in real-time applications such as games.

Paper is available on ACM.org for free.

 

FrostbiteEngine: RT @qilue: Meet Alex Fry from #EAGuildford & learn what he does as Senior Software Engineer for @FrostbiteEngine! https://t.co/HbcI4c2hx0 #…

FrostbiteEngine: RT @qilue: Meet Alex Fry from #EAGuildford & learn what he does as Senior Software Engineer for @FrostbiteEngine! https://t.co/HbcI4c2hx0 #…

Detailed technical talk & course notes from SIGGRAPH 2014 of how we have transit…
Detailed technical talk & course notes from SIGGRAPH 2014 of how we have transitioned Frostbite to physically-based rendering to achieve high-end cinematic visuals while also making it easier to build high-quality art & content for our games. Enjoy!


Moving Frostbite to PBR - Frostbite
www.frostbite.com
Course presentation at SIGGRAPH 2014 by Charles de Rousiers & Sébastian Lagarde about transitioning Frostbite to physically-based rendering.
Frostbite 2 – Usage in Army of Two
Frostbite Tech Demo: Battlefield 4 on iOS

Frostbite Tech Demo: Battlefield 4 on iOS

Frostbite is not only the heart of the Battlefield games on PC and console – it’s also pushing technical boundaries on mobile. Kristoffer Benjaminsson, Product Owner for Mobile at Frostbite, tells you about the team’s greatest mobile challenge yet – getting parts of Battlefield 4 running on iOS.

Frostbite is known for being cutting edge. Everything from rendering to destruction to the scale of our worlds is constantly pushing the boundaries for video games. Highly detailed and dynamic environments are key pillars to any Frostbite game – and mobile is no difference. Whatever you can do on console should be doable on mobile as well!

The Frostbite engine has already explored mobile gaming with the Battlefield 4 Commander App, and at the Apple WWDC event earlier this year we showcased a Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare tech demo running on an iPad Air. 1.3 million triangles showing up on screen simultaneously showed what the engine was capable of.

The next step? We wanted to get parts of Battlefield 4 running on iOS.

bf4_ios_1

It has been quite a challenge. To handle dynamic features such as destruction or moving light sources, most things in the Frostbite engine happen in realtime. This puts extra demand on performance to be able to deliver large, highly detailed worlds with superb visual quality. We were making great progress feature-wise, but hardware and software limitations forced us to either scale down the number of objects and their complexity to retain visual fidelity, or accept lower visual fidelity to cope with a larger number of objects.

This all changed when Apple introduced Metal, their new low-level graphics API, which allowed us to make full use of the hardware. Together with the latest range of hardware, Metal has created possibilities previously out of reach and for the first time we can include both high visual fidelity and a large number of objects.

bf4_ios_2

So to see exactly how far we could take the engine on mobile we set ourselves up for a real challenge: getting selected parts of the Battlefield 4 – truly a visually demanding game – running on iOS! I want to stress that this has been a tech demo to test the engine capabilities, and nothing else.

There is still much to do, but we’re very happy with the results so far. It’s a great feeling porting a system, get it running, and discover that there’s actually performance left. Even though we have much room for performance improvements on our end, we’re pleasantly surprised of the performance we’re getting from the hardware.

We’ll wait for future posts to dig into more details about this, but we are ready to share some screenshots of our work in progress. We hope you find them as exciting as we do.

Until next time!

Kristoffer Benjaminsson

Product Owner Mobile, Frostbite Stockholm

Lighting the City of Glass

Lighting the City of Glass

Presentation by Fabien Christin from DICE at GDC 2016.

Overview
Designing a big city that players can explore by day and by night while improving on the unique visual from the first Mirror’s Edge game isn’t an easy task.

In this talk, the tools and technology used to render Mirror’s Edge: Catalyst will be discussed. From the physical sky to the reflection tech, the speakers will show how they tamed the new Frostbite 3 PBR engine to deliver realistic images with stylized visuals.
They will talk about the artistic and technical challenges they faced and how they tried to overcome them, from the simple light settings and Enlighten workflow to character shading and color grading.

Takeaway
Attendees will get an insight of technical and artistic techniques used to create a dynamic time of day system with updating radiosity and reflections.

Intended Audience
This session is targeted to game artists, technical artists and graphics programmers who want to know more about Mirror’s Edge: Catalyst rendering technology, lighting tools and shading tricks.

FrostbiteEngine: RT @masseffect: Get ready, Andromeda. We're coming. Watch the new Mass Effect: Andromeda cinematic trailer: https://t.co/H2eaRRQzW9 https…

FrostbiteEngine: RT @masseffect: Get ready, Andromeda. We're coming. Watch the new Mass Effect: Andromeda cinematic trailer: https://t.co/H2eaRRQzW9 https…


Creating BioWare’s First RPG on the Frostbite Engine

Creating BioWare’s First RPG on the Frostbite Engine

The following is a guest blog post written by Jacques Lebrun, Technical Director at Bioware working on Dragon Age Inquisition. As time goes by, we will try to bring you more input from the developers behind the Frostbite engine, but also from all the teams using it to create great games.

As I write this, the Dragon Age team is only a couple of months away from putting the finishing touches on Inquisition, so it’s appropriate to look back at the long and arduous journey of getting to this point. Shortly after the launch of Dragon Age II, with a new generation of gaming on the horizon, we knew we needed to stretch our ambition and deliver a game well beyond anything BioWare had done before, which meant a major shift in technology and in the way we develop our games.

Finding Our Match

We started with an independent evaluation of engine technologies. We looked at an upgrade to our own Eclipse engine, at third-party game engines, and at game engines developed within EA, including DICE’s Frostbite. After a three-month evaluation, we chose Frostbite as our preferred technology for BioWare’s next generation of titles. There was no corporate mandate; this was decided unanimously within our studio. The timing was perfect because the Frostbite team was already making plans to break out into an independent engine team.

Many other teams in EA were coming to the same conclusions. We were suddenly part of a growing community of developers able to share ideas, share code, and collaborate on common interests. This will open up all kinds of opportunities for BioWare since we’ve traditionally developed our games in a vacuum. (Until now, every BioWare title has made their own technology assessments, which has prevented us from collaborating on improvements.)

Frostbite gives us best-of-class visuals, far more advanced than anything seen in a BioWare title. We typically focus our technology efforts on improving storytelling and gameplay, so pairing up with a team obsessed with physically accurate rendering was a great fit. We were also impressed by Frostbite’s capabilities for creating massive environments, with powerful terrain generation tools and flexible streaming options.

Frostbite is also highly scalable, letting games optimize quality settings to suit the capabilities of a wide range of hardware. We faced the significant challenge of developing a game that would target the old and new generations of game consoles. We wanted to develop Inquisition for the new consoles first and foremost, and the scalability of the engine let us get as much as we could out of the previous generation while still providing a gameplay experience on par with the new generation’s offerings.

Dragon Age Inquisition

A Clean Slate

While Frostbite solved one set of problems for us, we were facing with a completely different set in building a story-focused RPG in the engine. It was initially designed for shooters, and we identified a number of additions required to support an RPG.

BioWare games are known for developing its characters and story through cinematics and interactive dialogue. We’ve spent years developing a powerful suite of tools for writing and scripting conversations into a cinematic experience that interacts with a complex plot structure, while feeding into the pipeline for voice-over recording and localization. Many of these tools wouldn’t integrate with the Frostbite tool chain, so we rewrote them for the new framework. It was a massive undertaking we wanted to do only once for all of our future games. Accordingly, we collaborated with the Frostbite animation team to develop engine improvements that would support rapid creation of cinematic content. We also worked with the teams for the next Mass Effect game and the unannounced IP to incorporate the cinematic authoring tools into the workflows for conversation scripting and localization.

Another major undertaking was creating a next-generation RPG combat system. We created new workflows in the Frostbite toolset for visualizing animations with visual effects, sound effects, and gameplay scripts. This visual workflow has allowed our designers to create hundreds of unique spells and abilities along with a wide variety of interesting and challenging enemies. The dragons that you’ll encounter emphasize the complexity that we can now get from our combat systems. These apex predators showcase targetable limbs and a component system that lets designers reconfigure each dragon to take on a unique set of behaviors.

Dragon Age Inquisition

The Frostbite engine is designed to let game teams make modular extensions that other games can then use. Collaborating on common modules means that we could do the tedious work once and leverage it in our future titles. Cinematics and combat are only a fraction of the many additions we needed to make to the engine. If you look at the Venn diagram of everything you put into a fantasy RPG that isn’t in a modern shooter, the list is daunting: character statistics, character customization, melee combat, magical effects, items, crafting. Even a concept as simple as pausing the game during combat represented a difficult problem that hadn’t been solved in Frostbite yet.

From the get-go, we didn’t want to simply take the engine and branch off a BioWare version. Instead, we wanted to work with the Frostbite team to keep up with the latest improvements and, at the same time, contribute the improvements we were making. That’s easier said than done while the engine is undergoing major enhancements and we’re making major additions. We needed the discipline to resist design patterns developed from our previous titles and the rigor to carefully review every modification to engine code. Keeping our code in sync with the Frostbite development code required a massive effort, but it paid off in the critical updates we received from the Frostbite team: the majority of the next-generation platform code, continuous improvements to the toolset, and hundreds of cool features, such as terrain that can have caves built into it.

Looking Forward

Dragon Age: Inquisition represents BioWare’s first next-generation RPG on the Frostbite engine, and the games we’re developing now will only build on this foundation. Several years ago, we placed a few big bets on moving to the Frostbite engine and changing our development methodologies. It’s exciting to be able to finally soon lay down our hand.
Jacques Lebrun

Technical Director, Dragon Age: Inquisition

Photogrammetry and Star Wars Battlefront

Photogrammetry and Star Wars Battlefront

Presentation by Andrew Hamilton and Ken Brown from DICE at GDC 2016.

Overview
Photogrammetry has started to gain steam within the Games Industry in recent years. At DICE, this technique was first used on Battlefield and they fully embraced the technology and workflow for Star Wars: Battlefront. This talk will cover their research and development, planning and production, techniques, key takeaways and plans for the future. The speakers will cover photogrammetry as a technology, but more than that, show that it’s not a magic bullet but instead a tool like any other that can be used to help achieve your artistic vision and craft.

Takeaway
Come and learn how (and why) photogrammetry was used to create the world of Star Wars. This talk will cover Battlefront’s use of of the technology from pre-production to launch as well as some of their philosophies around photogrammetry as a tool. Many visuals will be included!

Intended Audience
A content creator friendly talk intended for pretty much any developer, especially those involved in 3D content creation. It is not a technical talk focused on the code or engineering of photogrammetry. The speakers will quickly cover all basics, so absolutely no prerequisite knowledge required.

FrostbiteEngine: Star Wars Battlefront Rogue One: VR Mission – our first VR game on Frostbite! Free on PSN. https://t.co/poptI5VZtf

FrostbiteEngine: Star Wars Battlefront Rogue One: VR Mission - our first VR game on Frostbite! Free on PSN. https://t.co/poptI5VZtf


PGA TOUR 15

PGA TOUR 15

Developed by EA Tiburon, EA PGA TOUR will be the first sports game to take advantage of the unique technology from Frostbite 3, letting you enjoy golf just the way you like it!

Battlefield Hardline

By using Frostbite 3, the developers of EA PGA TOUR are able to create complex, lifelike environments in order to recreate some of the authentic courses for you to play on. These fully rendered environments will let you explore every inch of the varied courses offered, from TPC Sawgrass to fantasy courses such as the Paracel Storm map from Battlefield 4.

Delving further into the actual gameplay side, EA SPORTS PGA TOUR will enable you to stream an entire 18-hole course at once.

Welcome to golf without limits!

Optimizing the Graphics Pipeline with Compute

Optimizing the Graphics Pipeline with Compute

Technical talk by Graham Wihlidal at GDC 2016.

With further advancement in the current console cycle, new tricks are being learned to squeeze the maximum performance out of the hardware. This talk will present how the compute power of the console and PC GPUs can be used to improve the triangle throughput beyond the limits of the fixed function hardware. The discussed method shows a way to perform efficient “just-in-time” optimization of geometry, and opens the way for per-primitive filtering kernels and procedural geometry processing.

Takeaway:
Attendees will learn how to preprocess geometry on-the-fly per frame to improve rendering performance and efficiency.

Intended Audience:
This presentation is targeting seasoned graphics developers. Experience with DirectX 12 and GCN is recommended, but not required.